AdvertisingBody ImageOn The PulseRetailSexualization

Abercrombie & Fitch sells padded push-up bras to seven-year-olds for no good reason

By March 30, 2011 10 Comments
Abercrombie & Fitch

Abercrombie & Fitch's website peddled padded push-up bras to girls as young as seven.

Perplexed about what to get the seven-year-old in your life who has it all?

Why, a heavily padded push-up bikini bra, natch!

Normally, “padded push-up bra” and “seven-year-old” only converge in the same sentence if accompanied by “Child Protective Services” or Toddler and Tiaras.”

But Abercrombie & Fitch, purveyor of all things preppy and pricey, has done the impossible and once again cross the line of bad taste (their infamous catalogues have widely been regarded as  “soft-core porn“).

The retailer recently unveiled a spring line of bikinis featuring “the push-up triangle” bra marketed to girls as young as seven.

If you listen closely, you can actually hear the sound of parents tearing their hair out.

Abercrombie’s first reaction to the obvious outrage and backlash was to change the description on their website from “push-up” to “padded.”

Because the illusion of disproportionately large breasts on a seven-year-old is less offensive than the illusion of entirely inappropriate cleavage on a seven-year-old?

Abercrombie previously came under fire for marketing thongs (featuring the words "eye candy" and "wink wink") to 10-year-olds. Seriously.

Abercrombie previously came under fire for marketing thongs (featuring the words "eye candy" and "wink wink") to 10-year-olds. Seriously.

The swimsuit disappeared from the company’s website on Tuesday, and while I’d love to think it was because Abercrombie realized the horrific error of their ways, I’m guessing it was more likely their publicity stunt was just less profitable than they’d hoped.

What more is there to say? The idea was disgusting, deplorable, and contributed just a bit more to the countless ways in which young (make that very young) girls are constantly being sexualized.

Newsflash, Abercrombie: Children’s retail should not operate under the philosophy of “sex sells.”

–Michelle Konstantinovsky is a student at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism and an avid admirer of shiny objects and preteen entertainment. It would be nice if you visited her website: www.michellekmedia.com. Also, she may learn to use Twitter more effectively if you follow her @michelley415.