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Media finds Kate Middleton’s new body more interesting than new son

By July 28, 2013 3 Comments

I hate to say it, but the way I found out about Prince George’s birth was through reading this article.

I was happy to see the body-positive title, “Kate Middleton’s royal baby post-bump is a boost of confidence for new mums everywhere” — despite the strange wording (“baby post-bump”?). However, I was sickened by the fact that the Duchess of Cambridge had just delivered a baby prince and all anyone cared about was her body.

Photo of the Royal family.

Dear Media, in case you were too busy looking at Kate’s bump to notice, that bundle to her left is Prince George. Just FYI.

Though Yahoo’s article was fairly body-positive, there were some places in which the strain of body-acceptance was visible. The worst? “But despite her luscious locks, flawless make-up, and glowing tan, there was one facet of her figure that was incongruous with the Kate we’ve all come to recognize — her post-baby bump.”

What I gleaned from that lovely tidbit was: nice hair, good make-up, and tan skin are good. Post-baby bumps are bad. And newborn royal children should be ignored so we can talk about their mothers’ looks.

It is absolutely unrealistic that “we” have come to expect Kate Middleton to have a flat stomach; she’s been pregnant for, well, nine months.

It’s not like “we” haven’t had time to become acquainted with her pregnant figure. A baby bump is a natural sign of pregnancy, and it doesn’t just disappear after delivering. Even if the media wants it to. (I’m looking at you, OK! magazine!)

My hope for the Duchess of Cambridge is that the media will start emphasizing what she does instead of how she looks. I hope that someday, people can type in “Kate Middleton” on Google and the fourth search suggestion that appears will not be “Kate Middleton weight”, but rather “Kate Middleton charity”.

I hope we can accept post-pregnancy bodies with the same attitude as Katy Hill, former Blue Peter presenter: “Don’t waste a precious moment of that new life worrying. Live in the moment and celebrate your new body for the fact that it’s just CREATED A HUMAN! HELLO!

Elizabeth Frankel is a Minnesotan who loves psychology, theatre, and anything related to horses. She seeks to understand why the world is the way it is through critical thinking, and when that fails, she just employs sarcasm.