Think only white women get eating disorders? Think again.

In popular culture, stories of eating disorders are dominated by white women. But what about the other sufferers? Women of color have been sidelined in eating disorder funding and research, and have therefore been underestimated in our perception of the affected demographic. In the new Slate article “Eating disorders do not discriminate“, Michelle Konstantinovsky explores… Continue Reading →

Stop and smell the roses, don’t instagram them

It’s been made pretty clear that social media can have a negative impact on the self-esteem of its users; yet we continue to use it. We’re all guilty of it. How many times a day do you find yourself aimlessly scrolling through your Facebook/Twitter/Instagram feed? Probably more than you would like to admit. Kesha (yes,… Continue Reading →

Tabloids tell the truth in new media campaign

“What if we cared about those living in poverty as much as we care about celebrities?”  This is a simple question asked by WoodGreen Community Services to raise awareness about the daily struggles of single mothers living in poverty. WoodGreen, a large social service agency in Toronto, works to help people find job training, affordable… Continue Reading →

Stereotypes in three dimensions

You may have already read about my outrage at “the pink aisle” – otherwise known as the preponderance of stereotype-based toys for girls – and I was recently disappointed to learn that LEGO has sunk to new lows in the ranks of the pink. In 2012, LEGO met with SPARK, an organization that works with girls and women… Continue Reading →

Dresses for power

I am angry that women are not taken seriously – all too often, based on how they look. If women were taken seriously, state senator Wendy Davis wouldn’t face ridicule from her own colleagues for daring to both be a mother and have a career in politics. Star tennis player Eugenie Bouchard wouldn’t be interviewed,… Continue Reading →

Stop making movies about douchebags

Let me introduce The Douche Test! It is a gender portrayal test for movies, to use alongside The Bechdel Test. The steps are simple, just ask yourself: 1) Does the male lead character not threaten, objectify, make fun of, or in any other way mistreat a woman during the movie? 2) Does the lead character… Continue Reading →

Objectifying an Object: Barbie and the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue

The Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue is a friendly annual reminder that the media’s obsession with sexualizing and objectifying women is still very much alive. Despite the magazine’s focus on sports and athleticism, the swimsuit issue focuses on the bodies of conventionally attractive women—almost none of whom are actually athletes. This year is a bit different,… Continue Reading →